Christmas Closure – Order before Dec 16th for freight. Last pickups on Dec 21st from Botany.

Before/After – Engineered Bamboo Slats

Is your old Colourbond® or timber fence falling apart? Now is the perfect time to refresh your backyard with some elegant fencing and screening upgrades.

Engineered bamboo slats are an easy way to give an old fence or unsightly wall a brand new modern look.

See for yourself how you can transform your space using our SeaChange Series® with the before/after photos below.

Credit: LivingLot

Our engineered bamboo slats received the highest certifications from Global GreenTag: a GreenRate Level A and a Platinum Health rating, guaranteeing sustainable manufacturing practices and non toxicity.

Our SeaChange Series® has 5 different batten designs, all named after iconic Australian beaches: Torquay, Cottesloe, Noosa, Sorrento and Sapphire. See them all on display at our Sydney showroom (13 Erith Street, Botany) or at the Build & Design Centre in Brisbane (66 Merivale Street, South Brisbane).

Engineered bamboo slats are a great way to provide privacy and shade while letting natural light and air flow circulate.

If you’d like to discuss residential or commercial projects with House of Bamboo® Design Consultants, call 1300 665 703 or email all relevant information and photos to [email protected]

Woolworths Food Group champions bamboo in their new Wellness Centre in Mortdale.

As part of their continued mission to grow toward a greener future, Woolworths Food Group have included bamboo in the design of their new Health & Wellness concept in Mortdale, NSW. Flat laminated bamboo panels and three hundred engineered bamboo battens from House of Bamboo® were meticulously used throughout the department.

Jessica Leckie, Industrial Designer at Woolworths Food Group has been instrumental in the push for bamboo for this specific store.

“When selecting finishes for this concept, we endeavoured to communicate our brand values. As a renewable resource, bamboo is aligned with our mission to contribute to a sustainable future and it aligns to our Health & Wellness customers’ values. The use of this material also  aligns with the increased use of bamboo we are seeing in health and beauty accessories such as bamboo toothbrushes, gloves, combs etc. ”

The engineered bamboo panels and battens used in this design received the two highest certifications delivered by Global GreenTag, the key certifying body for sustainably manufactured materials: a GreenRate Level A which guarantees the product was manufactured in the most sustainable way possible, and a Health Product Description Platinum which certifies the product is non toxic and can be used for health care and aged care applications.

Achieving such high standards was a priority for Jennifer Snyders, CEO of House of Bamboo®, in her efforts to cut through the ambient greenwashing and ensure the safety of her clients.

“Global GreenTag certified products achieve the world’s toughest standards and put the power to choose back into the consumer’s hands. I am thrilled that Woolworths selected a raw material with the highest Global GreenTag ratings in order to minimise their carbon footprint and provide a healthier environment for their team and customers. Their mission to create a better tomorrow  and particularly their commitment to use sustainable materials is inspiring. I also commend their joinery partners who embraced bamboo and brought out its natural beauty throughout the store.”
To learn more about House of Bamboo®’s Global GreenTag Certifications, read on here. If you’d like to discuss residential or commercial projects with House of Bamboo® Design Consultants, call 1300 665 703 or email [email protected]

After a large portion of our timber resources went up in smoke during the 2020 bushfires and with the exponential growth of the real estate market encouraging homeowners and investors to build and renovate, construction professionals have been warning of a perfect storm. This timber shortage not only creates delays and steep price increases, it hurts small businesses and endangers forests that have so far been protected.And yet, there is a naturally sustainable alternative to timber that remains overlooked: bamboo. Part of the reason for this oversight is that bamboo is technically a grass so the standards used to specify timber can not apply. Another reason lies in the unilateral perception most people have of the material, an irregular and exotic looking tube, suited for tiki bars and Bali style fences. But bamboo poles can now be engineered into laminated and strand woven battens, flooring, cladding, decking, benchtops etc. If the structural use of bamboo in frames, beams and load bearing applications remains to be standardized in Australia, its potential for freestanding applications is unlimited.And bamboo does not only provide a similar finish as timber, it is also much lighter and harder than most timbers making it easier to install and extremely durable. And last but not least, it is a far superior choice when it comes to sustainability. Bamboo produces 35% more oxygen than trees and is ready to harvest in as little as 5 years, as opposed to 80 years for Tasmanian oak for example. This flash growth means it can store up to 4 times more carbon dioxide than trees making it a material of choice for specifiers committed to achieving net zero goals.If your home renovation or commercial project is being impacted by the timber shortage crisis, ask yourself: “can I do this with bamboo?” and call our Design Consultants on 1300 665 703 to find out how you can incorporate bamboo into your designs.

It is no secret that bamboo is an incredibly versatile material for architects and interior designers to work with. Traditionally used for structural purposes, it is now mostly used for its visual appeal. To help you decide where to travel when borders finally open, or to inspire you to turn your home into a holiday destination, we rounded up our favourite hotels, holidays houses, lodges and accommodation of all sorts that champion bamboo and natural materials. (Pictured above: Resende Villas and Barracuda Beach Hotel & Villas shot by Tarso Figueira).

1 – Wild Coast Tented Lodge, Sri LankaThis spectacular 5-star resort on the edge of Yala National Park is not only an architectural wonder, it is also a masterclass in sustainability. Because of its close proximity with the national park, it was built with as little impact as possible on the local environment. Our favourite feature is the impressive bamboo chandelier that floats over the bar, suspended to the 10m bamboo dome crowning the restaurant. (image: Marc Hernandez Folguera)

2 – Bamboo Lodge – ChinaIf there is a hotel on this list that makes the most of bamboo’s versatility, it is Bamboo Lodge in China. From bamboo poles lining up the restaurant’s ceiling to the monumental balustrade of the main staircase and the curved feature walls in all bedrooms, this project is proof that bamboo applications are only limited by our imagination. And if you are a rattan enthusiast, this handcrafted mosaic should inspire you for your next DIY project. (Image: Ce Wang, Junwu Long)

3 – Bawah Reserve, Indonesia6 islands, 3 lagoons, 13 beaches. That is all yours to discover when you stay in the remote Anambas Archipelago 300km northeast of Singapore. Turquoise waters, white sand and bamboo galore is what awaits you at this luxury resort, built above the lagoon. From the tikki bar inspired restaurant to the open spa hut, Bawah Reserve is a true testament of the structural strength of bamboo. (Image: luxurytravelmag)

4 – Hotel Jakarta, AmsterdamYou would not think you are in the docks of Amsterdam when walking along the bamboo cladded walls of Hotel Jakarta. The 4-star hotel stands at the edge of the river where ships used to depart for Indonesia in the 19th century. Architects used bamboo veneers, panels and beams throughout the building which contributed to Hotel Jakarta receiving an “Excellent” rating from BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method). (Image: booking.com)

5 – Sala Samui Chaweng Beach Resort, ThailandOpen since 2018, this resort took 5 years to design and build. And it is easy to see why. Each room is unique and different styles cohabit in harmony throughout the property. The lobby featuring an undulating ceiling of bamboo blinds has pure Santorini vibes, the spa is a brightly coloured pop art studio and the rattan-lined bathrooms and bamboo screened private pools transport guests to Bali. The resort may be surrounded by pristine beaches and lush rainforest but it’s the flawless design of the complex that steals the show. (Image: Wworkspace , Wison Tungthunya)

6 – Peliva Nature & Suites, GreeceNestled between an olive grove and cliffs overlooking the Pagasetic Gulf, this stylish holiday house is Greek living at its best. The reed pergola allows guests to sit outside and take in the unobstructed ocean views while rattan is cleverly used throughout the house from the living room to the bedrooms. The colour palette is exclusively composed of neutral tones that naturally blend in with the surrounding landscape conveying a sense of calm and serenity. (Image: Dimitris Spyrou)

7 – Innhouse Eco Hotel, ChinaEchoing the natural beauty of the surrounding forests, this eco-hotel in China was built as a model for responsible tourism in the region. Fully cladded with laminated bamboo, it is a perfect example of environmentally sensitive architecture coupled with contemporary design. (Image: Oval Partnership)

8 – Playa Viva Treehouse, MexicoThe most coveted room of the Playa Viva resort in Guerrerro is their picture-perfect bamboo treehouse located right on the beach. Spread on two levels, this open-air villa stays true to the sustainable mission of the resort. Built with local resources (wood, palms, carved stones and of course bamboo) it runs exclusively on solar power and all water is recycled. (Image: The Cubic Studio , Leonardo Palafox)9 – Boheme Hotel, MykonosBoheme may be located on Mykonos but its design is pure Santorini. White walls, pure lines, vibrant vegetation and tonkin pergolas. Probably one of the easiest interior design styles to replicate at home. You may just have to pass on the expansive water views. (Image: booking.com)

10 – Marriott Resort Momi Bay, FijiAs guests step in the grand lobby of the Marriott Resort in Momi Bay,  their eyes are instantly drawn to the cathedral-like ceiling entirely wrapped in palm fibre. Proudly supplied by House of Bamboo, this textured material was chosen by Chada designers to pay tribute to the original Fijian huts while blending seamlessly with the more contemporary design of the resort. (Image: Marriott) 11 – Tiing Hotel, BaliIt would be near impossible to list all the villas, lodges, hotels, huts and resorts that showcase bamboo in Bali but Tiing Hotel deserves a special mention. Far from your usual Bali style accommodation, it pays homage to the famous local grass in a subtle yet arresting way. If bamboo poles are used to clad the doors of this ultra modern villa, they were also imprinted in the concrete walls, leaving their trace without compromising the contemporary design of the space. (Image: Ben Hosking).If you feel inspired to feature bamboo or other natural and sustainable materials such as rattan, Natureed® and palm fibre in your home or professional projects, reach out to our team of Design Consultants on 1300 665 703 or via email at [email protected] and we’ll make your resort dreams a reality.

With more and more brands jumping on the sustainable bandwagon it gets harder and harder to distinguish between products making a real difference and greenwashing. This is the observation that led to the creation of Global GreenTag, an organisation providing tools to “cut through the greenwash and empower professionals and consumers alike to confidently choose products that have been made in the most planet-friendly way possible”. After months of thorough audit, we’ve recently received two Global GreenTag certifications, a Green Rate Level A and a Platinum Health Rating. The in-depth process took six months to complete, and we put everything up for scrutiny, from our harvesting practices through to our factory processes. It’s an open, transparent way of telling the world that sustainability is at the heart of everything we do and that you can wholly trust our claims.

Global Green Tag Certified

What’s the difference between GreenRate and Health Rating?

Global GreenTag’s GreenRate certification allows you to answer the question, “which product is more sustainable?” from a group of flooring products like carpet, ceramic tiles, rubber, cork, vinyl, timber etc. and for the first time ever, get a scientifically valid answer.  It looks at different aspects of the product and its ingredients at various stages and for various issues including; aspects of resource use (post consumer recycled and rapidly renewable content), waste reduction, availability of greenhouse and water footprints. It is recognised by the Green Building Council of Australia, New Zealand and South Africa as a rating system designed to meet the requirements of the Green Star® ‘Sustainable Products’ credits. All certified products are examined for ‘Fit-for-Purpose’ and confirmed for Building Code compliance with each product receiving one of the below three tags. We were certified Level A which equates to 100% ‘Sustainability Factor’ in the Green Star®* rating tools’ Sustainable Products credits.

Global Green Tag Certified Level AGlobal GreenTag’s PHD (Product Health Declaration) on the other hand doesn’t focus on the impact of a product on the environment but on our health. With people spending more and more time indoors, the Product Health Declaration was created to help prevent toxic products being used in workplaces and homes. It pushes for transparency to disclose risks and hazards in products used in construction. It is a little known fact, despite growing evidence, that toxic ingredients hidden in products used in workplace buildings play a crucial role in employees’ health and sickness. There are four levels of accreditation and we received the highest possible rating, Platinum, which is world leading. This should come as no surprise considering bamboo is naturally antibacterial but this certification guarantees the healthiness of the finished product, after it’s undergone engineered manufacturing. 

To avoid buying into companies engaging in greenwashing, consumers must educate themselves about the credibility of the products they are seeking. This can be done by choosing companies with marketing claims backed up by industry-recognised certifications and government-backed standards. Looking for sustainable products is the right mindset but fact-checking companies claiming green practices is the surest way to shop sustainably.

Traditional Bamboo Modern Architecture

Reinterpreting traditional materials with Modern Design

As far as sustainable and natural materials go, bamboo is one of the most impressive. It’s fast-growing, durable and can be used in a myriad of ways (not to mention it’s three times stronger than steel). In fact, Architectural Daily even called bamboo the ‘construction material of the future’ because of its sustainable and versatile characteristics.

A growing trend in the world of architecture and design over the past few years has seen organic pole bamboo elevated to new heights. From Europe to Asia, industry leaders are turning their attention to reimagining how we view and use bamboo in the modern age. This is especially important as we look towards building and supporting global initiatives that will adapt to ongoing climate change concerns.

As a result, bamboo is taking centre stage in a range of commercial and residential builds in new and exciting ways, by using a combination of contemporary technologies and traditional techniques.

Ceiling Design

Through the clever use of pole bamboo suspended from the roof, designer Nattapon Klinsuwan has been able to both connect and divide the different serviceable areas in this Bangkok hair salon. Using a layered approach, the ceiling waterfalls down to ground level, helping to define the space and create a warm, welcoming feel. This design also addresses interior styling considerations, as the space is complete without the need for interior design additions.


modern bamboo ceilling

Image Link: https://www.dezeen.com/2012/09/08/bamboosalon-in-bangkok-by-nkdw/

Experimental Design

Not one to be confined by traditional design and structures, Realrich Sjarief from R A W Architecture created a whimsical, dreamscape design for a residence in Indonesia. The design separates the steel plane truss roof structure and uses thousands of bamboo poles to make up a three-story building. The hero of this project is the curved façade, featuring multiple columns of bamboo, some fanning out towards the sky in a cathedral vault style. The curved nature of this design is replicated inside, which is also made entirely of bamboo.

 

Modern Bamboo design

Image Link: https://raw.co.id/portfolio/project-12-guha-bambu/

Architectural Screening

The use of pole bamboo in screening and fences has been popular for decades, however, now the full extent of its design possibilities are beginning to be explored. Wallflower Architecture + Design have recently used pole bamboo screening as a beautiful functional design element to wrap around a residential abode in Singapore. Not only is bamboo screening adaptable for Singapore’s tropical climate, but by using it in this way, the residents reap the benefits of filtered light and air flow during the day, and stylish privacy at night.

 

Modern Bamboo screening

Image Link: https://de51gn.com/wallflower-architecture-designs-house-in-singapore-with-bamboo-clad-facade-to-maintain-privacy-and-regulate-temperature.

Structural Elements

Traditionally bamboo has been used to create low-cost homes in mainly rural areas, and recently high-end designs at the other end of the market, however, Malaysian architect Eleena Jamil believes bamboo should be seen as a ‘modern and everyday construction material just like bricks, steel or concrete’. Her proposal is to use bamboo to build permanent and comfortable contemporary homes in suburban areas by incorporating bamboo into the entire structure of her bamboo terrace homes. This includes using it for load bearing walls, balconies and roofing in an aesthetically pleasing and economical way.

 

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Image Link: https://ej-architect.com/portfolio/bamboo-terrace-homes/https://ej-architect.com/portfolio/bamboo-terrace-homes/

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