Australia’s largest supplier of certified engineered bamboo and rattan.

M+ Museum Hong Kong


Nestled in Hong Kong’s dynamic West Kowloon Cultural District, the M+ Museum emerges as a beacon of contemporary culture, showcasing a striking commitment to sustainability and innovative design. Engineered by the globally acclaimed Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron, the museum’s unique upside-down T-shape isn’t just a visual marvel; it offers sweeping views of Victoria Harbour and seamlessly integrates with neighboring cultural icons like the Hong Kong Palace Museum and Xiqu Centre. The museum’s design extends across 33 galleries and multiple movie theaters, crowned by a verdant rooftop garden that exemplifies its ecological ethos. However, the true highlight of M+ Museum’s sustainability efforts is its extensive use of engineered bamboo — a testament to ​b​amboo’s innovation in environmentally friendly construction materials. ​E​ngineered bamboo materials featured throughout the building, including bamboo flooring, wall cladding, ceilings, and custom joinery. Notably, our factory specifically crafted the batten ceilings, staircases, balustrades, and handrails, each element celebrating the versatility and aesthetic appeal of bamboo. This expansive use of engineered bamboo sets a new benchmark in sustainable architecture, significantly enhancing the museum’s environmental footprint. It not only reflects M+ Museum’s dedication to ecological responsibility but also serves as an inspiration for future projects in the global cultural sector, championing a shift towards more sustainable construction and design practices. Through these efforts, M+ Museum not only upholds its commitment to artistic and environmental integrity but also highlights the immense potential of bamboo as a foundational element in modern architecture.

Products
Engineered Bamboo Applications

Project Type
Commercial (Cultural/Institutional)

Location
Hong Kong, West Kowloon Cultural District, facing Victoria Harbour

Architects | Designers
Herzog & de Meuron, TFP Farrells, and Arup

Photography
House of Bamboo, Ocula


House of Bamboo
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